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Gnadendorf

Gnadendorf

The magnetogram of this KGA shows 3 entrances. A suspected entrance near the north side of this KGA has been lost to a house.  The southeastern entrance would allow the light of the rising sun to fall through at some unremarkable date in late winter. The field where the KGA lies in slopes less than 3 degrees, and the direction of the southern entrance deviates less...

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Hornsburg 1

Hornsburg 1

This impressive KGA east of today’s Hornsburg had three ditches and two entrances. Standing at the western, slightly lower entrance it may have been possible to see towards the KGA opposite the valley, Hornsburg 2.  ...

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Hornsburg 2

Hornsburg 2

West of todays Hornsburg village we find traces of a KGA with two ditch rings and two entrances which fairly well follow today’s slope. The rising sun could be seen above the southeasterly entrance a few weeks before spring equinox, but this date seems again without geometrical peculiarity.  ...

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Immendorf

Immendorf

Immendorf used to be a cornerstone of the 2004 hypothesis about systematic stellar orientation. Its three ditches and the four earth bridges in line with the gaps in the double palisade rings form very straight lines, the orientation of which was suspected to be astronomically motivated. After horizon survey and modelling in the digital terrain it is now clear:...

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Kamegg

Kamegg

This KGA with two ditches and four entrances approximately pointing towards the cardinal directions has been investigated by large excavations in the 1980s and 1990s. The field has been changed significantly by recent terracing for agricultural use. In relation with the high horizon of the Kamp valley, we cannot show meaningful astronomical interpretation, however...

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Karnabrunn

Karnabrunn

This single ring-ditch features two entrances. In contrast to most others, here the entrances do not connect the slope line, but they lie nicely on the contour line in terrain sloping more than 5 degrees. Their azimuths appear to be of no astronomical-calendrical significance, although the sun would have been visible in the entrance about three weeks before spring...

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